Alekhine vs Reshevsky
1156
[Event "Kemeri"] [Site "Kemeri"] [Round "0"] [White "Alekhine"] [Black "Reshevsky"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B02"] [Opening "Alekhine: 2.e5 Nd5"] {1 ALEKHINE ( 1892-1946 ) Alekhine strove first and foremost to avoid passive positions Above all he was an attacker, and for the sake of attack he would gladly take risks Originality was a prominent feature of his play; although he usually avoided the well-known gambits he had a penchant for improvising his own His style may be described as an amalgam of fantasy, science, and ambition} 1. e4 Nf6 (1... e5 {Examples of the way Alekhine liked to treat the openings} 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. c3 Na5 9. Bc2 c5 10. d4 Qc7 11. Nbd2 O-O 12. Nf1 Bg4 13. Ne3 Bxf3 14. Qxf3 (14. gxf3 {also playable}) cxd4 15. Nf5 (15. cxd4 exd4 16. Nf5) dxc3 16. Qxc3 {White has attacking chances Alekhine - Fine, Hastings, 1936-37}) (1... e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nge2 (4. Bd2 dxe4 5. Nxe4 (5. Qg4 Qxd4 (5... Nf6 6. Qxg7 Rg8 7. Qh6 Nc6) 6. Nf3 (6. O-O-O) Nh6 7. Qf4 e5) Qxd4 6. Bd3 Bxd2+ 7. Qxd2 Qd8 {This cautious retreat is poor} (7... Qxb2 8. Rd1 Nd7 {Black can consolidate eventually This line conforms to Steinitz's dogma that a gambit can be refuted only by acceptingit}) 8. O-O-O Qe7 9. Nf3 Nf6 10. Rhe1 Nxe4 11. Rxe4 Nd7 12. Rg4 f5 13. Rf4 Nf6 14. Re1 g6 15. h3) dxe4 5. a3 Be7 6. Nxe4 Nc6 7. g4 {This much criticised move is typical of Alekhine's style} b6 (7... e5 8. d5 Nd4 9. N2c3) (7... Nf6 {Alekhine}) 8. Bg2 Bb7 9. c3 Nf6 10. N2g3 O-O {Too risky; Black could still get a reasonable game with Qd7 followed by Queenside castling} (10... Qd7 11. -- O-O-O) 11. g5 Nxe4 12. Nxe4 Kh8 13. Qh5 {With excellent attacking chances for White Alekhine - Euwe, 7th match game, 1935}) 2. e5 Nd5 3. Nf3 d6 4. d4 Bg4 5. c4 Nb6 6. Be2 dxe5 7. Nxe5 (7. c5 {Alekhine-Euwe ( 29 ) , 1935} e4 8. cxb6 exf3 9. Bxf3 Bxf3 10. Qxf3 Nc6 (10... axb6)) Bxe2 8. Qxe2 Qxd4 9. O-O (9. Na3 N8d7 (9... e6 10. Nc2) 10. Nf3 {Alekhine}) N8d7 10. Nxd7 Nxd7 11. Nc3 c6 12. Be3 Qe5 13. Rad1 e6 14. Qf3 O-O-O 15. Bxa7 Qa5 16. Bd4 Qf5 17. Qg3 {Alekhine is clearly bent on settling the issue in the middlegame} (17. Qxf5 {Another promising course}) e5 18. Be3 Bb4 19. Na4 Ba5 20. f4 {Directed at 20 Bc7 and 21 Pe4} Bc7 21. b3 f6 22. fxe5 Qe6 23. h3 Rhg8 (23... Nxe5 24. Nc5 {not allowing Qg4}) 24. Bd4 Nxe5 (24... fxe5 25. Qe3 e4 26. c5 Rde8) 25. Qc3 Nd7 26. c5 Rge8 27. b4 Nb8 (27... Qxa2 28. Ra1 Qe6 29. b5 -- 30. Nb6) 28. Nb6+ Bxb6 29. cxb6 Qxa2 30. Qg3 Rd7 (30... Qf7 31. Ra1 Rxd4 32. Ra8 Re5 33. Qxe5 {Alekhine}) 31. Bc5 (31. Bxf6 gxf6 32. Rxd7 Kxd7 33. Qc7+ Ke6 34. Re1+ {simpler ( Alekhine )}) Qf7 32. Ra1 Qg6 33. Qh2 Re5 34. Ra8 Rd2 (34... Qe8 35. Qg3) 35. Rxb8+ Kxb8 36. Qxe5+ fxe5 37. Rf8+ Qe8 38. Rxe8+ Rd8 39. Rxd8# 1-0
1-0
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1200
HITS
Players
WhiteAlekhine
BlackReshevsky
Game
Moves39
OpeningB02 — Alekhine: 2.e5 Nd5
Result1-0
Date
Tags
Tournament
TournamentKemeri
LocationKemeri
Round0