Fischer vs Reshevsky
1170
[Event "New York"] [Site "?"] [Round "5"] [White "Fischer"] [Black "Reshevsky"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B90"] [Opening "Sicilian: Najdorf"] {FISCHER (Born 1943) Usually the style of a chessmaster has to grow; it may take years before one may speak of any style at all. As a rule the young player begins with pure combination, and then in the course of time finds that he must add water to win. He learns the methods of positional play, and develops endgame technique. It is quite possible to begin as a combinative player - a tactician - and yet in maturing to acquire an out-and-out positional style of play. The exceptional Grandmaster Fischer, however, is another and almost unique story in modern chess. At the age of twenty he already possessed a fully rounded style. He is both tactician and strategist, an openings expert without peer, and a virtuoso of the endgame. The following game against Reshevsky is a good example of his super-class, technical style} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. h3 g6 7. g4 Bg7 8. g5 Nh5 9. Be2 e5 10. Nb3 Nf4 11. Nd5 Nxd5 (11... O-O 12. Nxf4 exf4 13. Bxf4 Bxb2 14. Bxd6) 12. Qxd5 Nc6 13. Bg4 Bxg4 (13... Qe7 14. -- Be6) 14. hxg4 Qc8 15. Qd1 Nd4 16. c3 Nxb3 17. axb3 Qe6 18. Ra5 f6 19. Qd5 $1 Qxd5 (19... Qxg4 20. Qxb7 O-O 21. gxf6 $1) 20. Rxd5 Kd7 21. gxf6 Bxf6 22. g5 $1 Be7 (22... Bg7 23. Rd3 -- 24. Rdh3 {winning the h-pawn}) 23. Ke2 Raf8 24. Be3 Rc8 25. b4 {Intending in due course to dissolve his doubled pawn by Pb5, and saddle Black with a weak pawn on the Queenside} 25... b5 {This should be avoided if possible. Black now has three vulnerbla points - a6, d6 and h7. How to profit from a situation like this was the subject of "Technique of Maneuvering". The present game prettily supplements the examples there given} 26. Rdd1 $1 Ke6 27. Ra1 Rc6 28. Rh3 {threatening to win the h-pawn} 28... Bf8 (28... -- 29. Rah1) 29. Rah1 Rc7 30. Rh4 $1 {Putting Black in a state of zugzwang} 30... d5 (30... Rc4 31. f3 Rc7 32. R4h3 $1) 31. Ra1 Rc6 (31... dxe4 32. Rxa6+ Kf5 (32... Kd5 33. Rxg6 { loses a pawn}) 33. Rf6#) 32. exd5+ Kxd5 33. Rd1+ Ke6 34. Rd8 Kf5 (34... -- 35. Re8+ Kf5 36. Rxe5+ Kxe5 37. Bd4+ Kf5 38. Bxh8 Kxg5 39. Rxh7) 35. Ra8 Re6 36. Rh3 Bg7 (36... -- 37. Rf3+) (36... Kg4 37. Rg3+ Kh4 38. Rf3 Bg7 39. Ra7 Rg8 40. Rd7 $1 {Black is in a mating net}) 37. Rxh8 Bxh8 38. Rxh7 Re8 39. Rf7+ Kg4 ( 39... Ke4) (39... Ke6 40. Ra7 $18) 40. f3+ Kg3 41. Kd3 {An aethestic flaw} (41. Kf1 -- (41... Kh4 42. Kg2) 42. Bf2+ Kh3 43. Rh7#) 41... e4+ 42. fxe4 Rd8+ 43. Bd4 Kg4 44. Rf1 Be5 (44... Kxg5 45. Rg1+ Kf4 46. Rxg6) 45. Ke3 Bc7 46. Rg1+ Kh5 47. Kf3 Rd7 48. e5 Rf7+ 49. Ke4 Rf5 50. e6 Bd8 51. Bf6 Bxf6 52. gxf6 Rxf6 53. Ke5 Rf2 54. Re1 1-0
1-0
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Players
WhiteFischer
BlackReshevsky
Game
Moves54
OpeningB90 — Sicilian: Najdorf
Result1-0
Date
Tags
Tournament
TournamentNew York
Location?
Round5