Alekhine vs Capablanca
877
[Event "Buenos Aires WCh (12)"] [Site "Buenos Aires WCh (12)"] [Round "0"] [White "Alekhine"] [Black "Capablanca"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E00"] [Opening "Queen's Pawn: Neo-Indian"] {Open file with support points} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Bg5 Nbd7 5. e3 Be7 6. Nf3 O-O 7. Rc1 c6 8. Qc2 a6 9. a3 h6 10. Bh4 Re8 11. Rd1 b5 12. cxb5 cxb5 13. Bd3 Bb7 14. O-O {Here it is obvious that the open c-file is of dominating importance. The routine idea of occupying the furthest available square on the open file is already on the cards; Black can play ... Nb6-c4. White can hardly occupy c5 just yet, not having played Pb4. From this point of view, Black is a little ahead. On the other hand, White retains the option of evicting a Black piece from c4 by playing Pb3. While Black holds the initiative, however, this may not be an easy matter} 14... Rc8 15. Qb1 Qa5 ( 15... Bxa3 16. bxa3 Rxc3 17. a4 {White simply regains the pawn}) (15... Nb6 { simpler}) 16. Ne2 Nb6 {The boxed in White Queen offers White the opportunity to make tactical complications} (16... b4 {more prudent}) 17. Ne5 (17. Bxf6 $1 {The Black cramped Queen offers tactics: White removes the guard of h7} 17... Bxf6 (17... gxf6 $1 18. Nf4 Nc4 19. Nxe6 fxe6 20. Bxc4 Rxc4 21. Qg6+ { perpetual check}) 18. b4 Qxa3 (18... Qa4 19. Rd2 Nc4 20. Ra2 -- 21. Qa1 -- 22. Rb1 -- 23. Nc3) 19. Bh7+ {the idea behind Bxf6, to remove the guard of h7 to vacate the d3 square for White's Rooks} 19... Kh8 20. Rd3 Qa4 21. Nc3 $16 { trapped piece}) 17... Nc4 18. Bxf6 Bxf6 $1 (18... gxf6 19. Nxf7 Kxf7 20. Bxc4 Rxc4 21. Qh7+ Kf8 22. Nf4) 19. Bh7+ Kf8 20. Nd7+ Ke7 21. Nc5 Qb6 (21... Rxc5 $1 22. dxc5 (22. b4 Nxa3 $1 23. bxa5 (23. Qb3 Qa4 24. Qxa4 bxa4 25. dxc5 g6 { Trapped Bishop}) 23... Nxb1 24. dxc5 Na3 {Black wins at least a second pawn}) 22... Nxb2 23. Rc1 Qxa3 $17 {decisive advantage to Black}) 22. Nxb7 Qxb7 23. Bd3 Rc7 {To double Rooks and thus extract full value out of his occupaton of c4. However, White can undermine the Knight with Pb3} (23... Kf8 24. -- Be7 { preventing Pb3}) 24. Qa2 $1 Rec8 25. b3 Nd6 26. Qd2 Qb6 27. Rc1 Kd7 28. Rxc7+ Rxc7 29. Bb1 {Exchanging one pair of Rooks, White has just about freed himself. He could, of cource, play for further exchanges by Rc1, but with this Bishop move he undertakes an interesting attempt to revive his own winning chances. He vacates d3 as a round for his own Knight outpost on c5} 29... Be7 30. Nf4 Kc8 31. Qe2 (31. Nd3 Ne4) 31... g6 32. Nd3 Ne4 33. b4 { Thr struggle for possession of the outpost reaches it's climax} 33... Rc3 $2 { This move in combination with the next move forms an instructive mistake} ( 33... Nd6 34. Nc5 Nc4 35. e4 $1 {Whtie still keeps the initiative}) 34. Qb2 Qc7 (34... Rc7 {have to lose a tempo}) 35. Nc5 {interference} 35... Bxc5 36. dxc5 Qe5 37. f4 $1 Qg7 (37... Qf6 38. Bxe4 dxe4 39. Rf2) 38. Bxe4 dxe4 39. Kf2 Qf6 40. g3 g5 41. Rc1 1-0
1-0
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Players
WhiteAlekhine
BlackCapablanca
Game
Moves41
OpeningE00 — Queen's Pawn: Neo-Indian
Result1-0
Date
Tags
Tournament
TournamentBuenos Aires WCh (12)
LocationBuenos Aires WCh (12)
Round0